Ashe Marshall, Attempting Author

“The first duty of the novelist is to entertain. It is a moral duty. People who read your books are sick, sad, traveling, in the hospital waiting room while someone is dying. Books are written by the alone for the alone.”

Donna Tartt, author of The Secret History (via vintageanchorbooks)

My own note: I think this duty is just as important when the people reading your books are happy, having a good stretch in their lives, relaxing in a hammock or on the beach.

(via gwendabond)

(via marthawells)

curiosityquills:

Being a Writer: A Pie Chart

curiosityquills:

Being a Writer: A Pie Chart

lianabrooks:

lorimlee:

laurendestefano:

bethrevis:

mikejung:

catagator:

Didn’t even get to close the search string before I was told I was wrong. 

This is appalling. What the hell, Google?

It’s not Google. Google just reflects what people search. It’s society that’s the problem. 

I didn’t believe this was real until I tried it myself just now. I even got the red squiggly.

WTFFFFFFF

All male characters are inherently unlikable because male characters are allowed to be humans with flaws and defects.
Name one male character who is absolutely wonderful and makes right choices all the time… having trouble? Male characters are not required to be nice, fit a certain height and weight requirement, or follow any rules. In fact, most memorable male characters don’t follow the rules. Murderers, adulterers, rapists, whore-mongers, and child abusers are all praised in main stream literature and media. You can be a pedophile and be a literary hero, no problems.
But women must observe the strict dictates of the male gaze. A female character must be nice, always right (to prove to men she’s good at things because men assume women are wrong and fictional women need to break them of that), always strong, always virtuous. A female character must not be fat (unless she is old or the butt of jokes), to short or tall, and must not speak out of turn, call people names, call people on their behavior, or act like a prat. 
Female characters who step out of the clearly defined role of a Fictional Female are considered unlikable. They are not fulfilling their duties to the male gaze or fitting the norms defined by centuries of misogyny. In point of fact, they’re behaving like real women, and that scares people.

lianabrooks:

lorimlee:

laurendestefano:

bethrevis:

mikejung:

catagator:

Didn’t even get to close the search string before I was told I was wrong. 

This is appalling. What the hell, Google?

It’s not Google. Google just reflects what people search. It’s society that’s the problem. 

I didn’t believe this was real until I tried it myself just now. I even got the red squiggly.

WTFFFFFFF

All male characters are inherently unlikable because male characters are allowed to be humans with flaws and defects.

Name one male character who is absolutely wonderful and makes right choices all the time… having trouble? Male characters are not required to be nice, fit a certain height and weight requirement, or follow any rules. In fact, most memorable male characters don’t follow the rules. Murderers, adulterers, rapists, whore-mongers, and child abusers are all praised in main stream literature and media. You can be a pedophile and be a literary hero, no problems.

But women must observe the strict dictates of the male gaze. A female character must be nice, always right (to prove to men she’s good at things because men assume women are wrong and fictional women need to break them of that), always strong, always virtuous. A female character must not be fat (unless she is old or the butt of jokes), to short or tall, and must not speak out of turn, call people names, call people on their behavior, or act like a prat. 

Female characters who step out of the clearly defined role of a Fictional Female are considered unlikable. They are not fulfilling their duties to the male gaze or fitting the norms defined by centuries of misogyny. In point of fact, they’re behaving like real women, and that scares people.

findinghomeinabook:

I will never cease to be amazed by books. Seriously. Just think about it: thousands of people read the same book but in each one’s mind the characters look different and the setting changes and we’re all reading the same thing but it’s so unique to each of us. That is insanely cool.

(via bethrevis)

deductionhunters:

theskeletonsareafterme:

zelamish:

wunderbrot:

the buugeng is a type of s-staff.
to the best of my knowledge, it is used to engage in geometric visual warfare

Accurate.

GEOMETRIC VISUAL WARFARE.

No but can you imagine how distracting and disconcerting it’d be to go up against someone with a weapon like that
You wouldn’t know where the fuck to look and you’d only figure out which part to focus on when it’s buried in your gut


Things I must write about

deductionhunters:

theskeletonsareafterme:

zelamish:

wunderbrot:

the buugeng is a type of s-staff.

to the best of my knowledge, it is used to engage in geometric visual warfare

Accurate.

GEOMETRIC VISUAL WARFARE.

No but can you imagine how distracting and disconcerting it’d be to go up against someone with a weapon like that

You wouldn’t know where the fuck to look and you’d only figure out which part to focus on when it’s buried in your gut

Things I must write about

(via allthebristory)

laurendestefano:

What you are looking at is a novel in its entirety written by my seven year old cousin. She figured that since I’m a writer, I would be the one to critique it. I had to hold myself back from totally losing it laughing. She didn’t understand what was so funny, though I probably should have known where things were going when she asked me how to spell “therapy.” It reads:

Once upon a time there was a girl named Violet. She was in love. But she did not tell anyone (sic). So she went to a therapist and got better with talking.

(In case you’re wondering, my advice was to add more to the story. She went on to write that the girl decided to fall in love with a tree instead since it didn’t talk).

laurendestefano:

What you are looking at is a novel in its entirety written by my seven year old cousin. She figured that since I’m a writer, I would be the one to critique it. I had to hold myself back from totally losing it laughing. She didn’t understand what was so funny, though I probably should have known where things were going when she asked me how to spell “therapy.” It reads:

Once upon a time there was a girl named Violet. She was in love. But she did not tell anyone (sic). So she went to a therapist and got better with talking.

(In case you’re wondering, my advice was to add more to the story. She went on to write that the girl decided to fall in love with a tree instead since it didn’t talk).