Ashley Wade, Attempting Author

Some writing inspiration for you http://ift.tt/1y3MAmm

Some writing inspiration for you http://ift.tt/1y3MAmm

“I’d like to counter that diversity in children’s media—and in young adult fantasy—is important because it’s for kids. Children and teens know that books aren’t real, but that doesn’t mean they aren’t also internalizing the messages. When diverse peoples and cultures aren’t a part of these fantasy worlds, young readers are being repeatedly told that they can’t have adventures like the characters because they don’t look the part, that they are less important than imaginary creatures. They’re being repeatedly told that their exclusion is the norm.”
— from More Elves of Color! Why Diversity in YA Fantasy Matters by Lori M. Lee (via bookriot)

(via corinneduyvis)

jesskhoury:

mindymcginnis:

Pretty much, yeah.

Everything I need to know about life I learned from Frog and Toad.

jesskhoury:

mindymcginnis:

Pretty much, yeah.

Everything I need to know about life I learned from Frog and Toad.

The more I write stories for young people, and the more young readers I meet, the more I’m struck by how much kids long to see themselves in stories. To see their identities and perspectives—their avatars—on the page. Not as issues to be addressed or as icons for social commentary, but simply as people who get to do cool things in amazing worlds. Yes, all the ‘issue’ books are great and have a place in literature, but it’s a different and wildly joyous gift to find yourself on the pages of an entertainment, experiencing the thrills and chills of a world more adventurous than our own.

And when you see that as a writer, you quickly realize that you don’t want to be the jerk who says to a young reader, ‘Sorry, kid. You don’t get to exist in this story; you’re too different.’ You don’t want to be part of our present dystopia that tells kids that if they just stopped being who they are they could have a story written about them, too. That’s the role of the bad guy in the dystopian stories, right? Given a choice, I’d rather be the storyteller who says every kid can have a chance to star.

Paolo Bacigalupi, Straight-Laced Dystopias  (via malapropsbookstore)

Love this.

(via elockhartbooks)

(Source: vickiexz, via lauraroselam)

“If we can’t write diversity into sci-fi, then what’s the point? You don’t create new worlds to give them all the same limits of the old ones.”
— Jane Espenson (from interview with Advocate.com)\ (via medievalpoc)

(Source: fluffymoalabear, via ultracheese)